Variety have continued the fevered speculation about Spielberg’s next project by reporting that he’ll team up with Tom Hanks to make a Cold War thriller.

Spielberg’s been linked with a number of projects recently, including religious drama The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara, historical epic Montezuma and a remake of West Side Story. There’s also sci-fi blockbuster Robopocalypse still in the pipeline.

Justin Kroll writes: “Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg are partnering again as Hanks has become attached to an untitled thriller set during the Cold War that Spielberg is eyeing to direct for DreamWorks.

"Marc Platt will produce with Spielberg, with Matt Charman penning the script.

"Based on the true story revolving around James Donovan (Hanks), a prominent American attorney enlisted by the CIA during the Cold War to slip behind the iron curtain to negotiate the release of a pilot captured when his U-2 spy plane was shot down over Russia."

Nothing has been officially confirmed yet, but with so many projects in the offing, it’s seeming possible that Spielberg’s lining up another ‘two films in one year’ set, similar to what we saw in 1993 (Jurassic Park and Schindler’s List) and 2005 (War of the Worlds and Munich).

If this Cold War film does come into fruition, it would mark Spielberg’s fourth collaboration with Hanks, following Saving Private Ryan, Catch Me If You Can and The Terminal.

Spielberg Moment #13: Fireside Chat (Lincoln)
When “Lincoln” was released, many commentators remarked that it was by far Spielberg’s most dialogue-heavy film to date. Indeed, much of “Lincoln” can be viewed as a stage play, though that is not to say that it isn’t cinematic and is merely filmed theatre.However, there is a scene early on that features very little dialogue yet manages to speak volumes.Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis) enters an office in the White House to find his ten year old son, Tad (Gulliver McGrath), asleep by an open fire place. Lincoln kneels down beside his son and proceeds to hold up two photographic plates, using the fire to illuminate them. Tad had been looking at these plates, which depict slave children. Lincoln then lays down beside Tad, brushes hair from his forehead and kisses him. Half-asleep, and in what appears to be a routine, Tad clambers onto his father’s back and they head for the boy’s bedroom. As they leave the office, Tad tells his father that he wants to see his brother Willie. Lincoln replies that he would like the same but that Willie has been gone for three years.For me, this is one of the best scenes in one of Spielberg’s finest films and manages to convey a huge amount in a short space of time and with very little dialogue. When Lincoln views the plates of the slave children (that are around the same age as Tad) we can see the weight of responsibility and duty that he feels as President of the United States. Simultaneously, we see Lincoln as a loving, caring father and one that has had to endure the unimaginable by outliving one of his children. The grief that Abraham and Tad Lincoln both express in this scene is understated but still very raw and palpable.In terms of Spielberg’s filmography, this scene can be viewed as an addition to his recurring theme of fathers and sons. It could also be viewed (and this may be stretching things a bit) that this scene also works in terms of Spielberg once again commenting on cinema and film-making with the use of the photographic plates; the essence of cinematography is, of course, a series of still photographs recorded and then displayed in quick succession.
Submitted by Tony Sower
If you’d like to contribute your own Spielberg Moment, just hit the Submit button or email at fromdirectorblog [at] gmail.com and do your thing!

Spielberg Moment #13: Fireside Chat (Lincoln)

When “Lincoln” was released, many commentators remarked that it was by far Spielberg’s most dialogue-heavy film to date. Indeed, much of “Lincoln” can be viewed as a stage play, though that is not to say that it isn’t cinematic and is merely filmed theatre.

However, there is a scene early on that features very little dialogue yet manages to speak volumes.

Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis) enters an office in the White House to find his ten year old son, Tad (Gulliver McGrath), asleep by an open fire place. Lincoln kneels down beside his son and proceeds to hold up two photographic plates, using the fire to illuminate them. Tad had been looking at these plates, which depict slave children. Lincoln then lays down beside Tad, brushes hair from his forehead and kisses him. Half-asleep, and in what appears to be a routine, Tad clambers onto his father’s back and they head for the boy’s bedroom. As they leave the office, Tad tells his father that he wants to see his brother Willie. Lincoln replies that he would like the same but that Willie has been gone for three years.

For me, this is one of the best scenes in one of Spielberg’s finest films and manages to convey a huge amount in a short space of time and with very little dialogue. When Lincoln views the plates of the slave children (that are around the same age as Tad) we can see the weight of responsibility and duty that he feels as President of the United States. Simultaneously, we see Lincoln as a loving, caring father and one that has had to endure the unimaginable by outliving one of his children. The grief that Abraham and Tad Lincoln both express in this scene is understated but still very raw and palpable.

In terms of Spielberg’s filmography, this scene can be viewed as an addition to his recurring theme of fathers and sons. It could also be viewed (and this may be stretching things a bit) that this scene also works in terms of Spielberg once again commenting on cinema and film-making with the use of the photographic plates; the essence of cinematography is, of course, a series of still photographs recorded and then displayed in quick succession.

Submitted by Tony Sower

If you’d like to contribute your own Spielberg Moment, just hit the Submit button or email at fromdirectorblog [at] gmail.com and do your thing!

Spielberg and Ford relax in between takes on the set of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

Spielberg and Ford relax in between takes on the set of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

The Spielberg Seven - dinosaursandotherawesomestuff

1. What’s your favourite Spielberg film and why?
Jurassic Park, it’s the first movie of his I saw and I was totally captivated by it.

2. What’s your least favourite Spielberg film and why?
Definitely 1941. I don’t really hate or dislike it badly but I’m not in a hurry to watch it.

3. If you had to select one Spielberg film to be remade, which would it be and who would direct it?
Jurassic Park (& the Lost World). I’d prefer a remake that mixes both elements of the books with the movies. (I’d still leave out the DX prion plot for the Lost World - not for the sake of more sequels but in favour for a more coherent conservation plot).

4. Do you prefer Spielberg’s ‘entertainment’ films or his historical dramas?
I grew up watching his “entertainment” films so seeing his more serious historical films seem a bit unbelievable but I appreciate those as much as his “entertainment” films.

5. What’s your favourite John Williams score for a Spielberg film and why?
It’s a hard question but I’d go for his work on the Jurassic Park movies and Empire of the Sun. I’m not good at describing music but those scores really move me.

6. Which book/comic book/TV show, or film remake, would you like to see Spielberg direct and why?
Probably something to do with the Gulf War, Operation Gothic Serpent (Black Hawk Down), or even something about the Falklands war.

7. What do you want to see from Spielberg in the future?
I want to see Spielberg directing a remake of Jurassic Park & the Lost World (we can all dream). Though whatever he does next I’ll be extremely optimistic about it. 

The dinosaursandotherswesomestuff blog can be seen here…

Spielberg and Martin Sheen on the set of Catch Me If You Can.

Spielberg and Martin Sheen on the set of Catch Me If You Can.

Spielberg and Harrison Ford share a joke on the set of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

Spielberg and Harrison Ford share a joke on the set of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.